Fences

Zebra Deck design, install and repair commercial and residential fences in Toronto and GTA area. From wide range design layouts to choosing the proper wood or composite material, to the actual installation – Zebra Deck get involved to make sure every project is done right. Contact us today to schedule an onsite quote.

Choose a fence style

Wooden fence

Wooden fence

Composite fence

Composite fence

Iron fence

Iron fence

We have 10 years experience building quality and stylish fences in Toronto and GTA area. 

Zebra Deck is a fully licensed, family owned business based in Mississauga and servicing Toronto and GTA. We working in a friendly, honest and professional manner to ensure you get the best quality fence that is built to stay many years. Zebra Deck offers the supply and construction of all styles of wooden and vinyl fences, gates, arbors, as well as different styles retaining walls and privacy screens. 

WHY A FENCE? 

Marking a boundary. Fences can serve the simple purpose of marking a boundary—the entire perimeter of your property, for example, or just one special area within it. Whether or not this is its main purpose, every fence marks a boundary, both visually and physically. It divides and separates, punctuating the difference between “this” and “that,” separating the public property from your private world, for instance, or a vegetable garden from a short-cropped lawn. A boundary fence organizes the landscape by giving it visual definition. Fences that mark boundaries also establish perceptual guidelines and patterns of use by clearly defining limits. 

Creating privacy. Fences that are eye level or taller can give a feeling of visual closure and privacy whether or not they are solid surfaces. Openwork fences—such as latticework, spaced slats, or even a completely open grid of 2 by is—can still give a feeling of closure and privacy because the eye tends to stop at the fence, where it is captured by the pattern itself and does not see what lies beyond. When selecting a fence style for privacy, you needn’t limit yourself to solid, wall-like fences, particularly if you are enclosing small spaces. This slatted fence proves the point. Property lines intersect at an acute angle—typically, a less than pleasant area to be in. 

Shaping and defining space. A section of fence can shape a large, undefined area into smaller ones, creating special places for special purposes. You can transform a nondescript front walk into a more refined and formal entry or into a receptive and welcoming one. You can create a garden work or storage area or a protected garbage can enclosure. Or you can introduce a pleasant feeling of background or enclosure in an open and diffuse space such as a large patio or terrace. When thinking about fences, include the possibility of strategically placed fence sections. 

Providing protection and security. Unless you want them to, fences needn’t look like barricades in order to protect and secure. Even low fences, or open, lightweight ones, can be effective for security fencing simply because they suggest limits and invite people to respect those limits. They deter unwanted entrants psychologically rather than physically. The strength of the infill and the height of the fence affect the amount of security and protection you can achieve. 

Buffering the effects of climate and noise. Fences can soften the harsh effects of chilling winds, beating rain, glaring sun, and drifting snow. Generally, infill with very small or medium-sized openings works best, no matter what type of material the fence is made of. This type of infill breaks, filters, or scatters the environmental forces into softer, more diffuse forms. A fence can't actually exclude noise the way a thick wall can unless it is high enough to block sound waves and is sheathed with solid infill on both sides. On the other hand, a fence can do a lot to insulate you from the annoyance of noise by buffering your perception of it. 

Enhancing the look of the house. Sometimes the sole purpose of a fence is to improve the overall look of the house and property. Because fences from a vertical plane, you can use this plane itself—style, finish and trim details aside—to reconfigure space and improve the overall ambiance of your property. If for example, your home is like a tiny island floating in an unbounded sea of landscaping, you can flank it with fencing. Planes of the fence on either side of a house extend it, giving the impression that it spans the width of the lot and is anchored in its space. Or; if the house is so close to the street that it seems to be in constant contact with the rush and tumble of public life, even a low fence can baffle the onslaught and create a little pocket of calm behind it. 

Given your functional priorities, the issue of fence style begins to take on new meaning. The style you choose must serve two purposes: It should be visually appealing, but it must also meet your functional needs.

In addition, think about aesthetics from the broadest perspective: Consider how you want your new fence to relate to your existing site. Your home and property already express a certain design theme, a particular character. The features that make up this character are the architectural style of the dwelling and the nature of the landscaping. The fence, as the newcomer in this setting, will work best if it harmonizes with the established design themes.

Fences create a strong visual impression. In one setting, a certain type of fencing material in a particular style and finish can be a stunning complement to the property. In a different setting, the same fence might seem awkward and uncomfortably out of place.

The average cost to build a fence averages between $1,000 and $5,000.

Before selecting a specific style, see which of the basic site design approaches will give you the quality of feeling you'd like your new fence to bring to the site.